Handling Requests for Religious Exemptions from Mandatory Vaccination Policies

Posted in Employee Handbooks & Policies, Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention, Employment Investigations & Audits, Employment Litigation, Medical & Other Leaves

Employers implementing mandatory COVID-19 vaccine policies are facing an avalanche of requests for exemptions as religious accommodations, far more than for medical exemptions. Fortunately, while employers are generally obligated to explore accommodations for requests based on a sincerely held religious belief, they are not necessarily obligated to grant exemptions.

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Federal Contractors Face Dec. 8 Vaccination Deadline

Posted in Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention, Workplace Safety & OSHA

Federal contractors covered by President Biden’s recent Executive Order 14042 must ensure that covered employees are fully vaccinated for COVID-19 no later than December 8, 2021, subject to applicable exceptions, pursuant to new Guidance published by the Safer Federal Workforce Task Force (Task Force). The Guidance was issued pursuant to President Biden’s COVID-19 Action Plan and Executive Order 14042, which we blogged about last month. All new covered contracts entered into on or after October 15, 2021 must incorporate the terms of the Guidance.

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Appellate Ruling Clouds California’s Ban on Mandatory Arbitration Clauses in Employment

Posted in Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention, Employment Litigation

Employers in California may not condition employment on entering into an arbitration agreement, but at the moment, it appears they may continue to enforce such agreements. The situation is muddled as a result of a federal appellate court ruling blocking a 2019 California law that made it illegal for an employer to condition employment or “any employment-related benefit” on entering into an arbitration agreement. On September 15, 2021, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which reviews the decisions of federal district courts in the nine westernmost states, including California, vacated a district court injunction blocking the 2019 law, known as Assembly Bill (AB) 51. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, in concert with six other business groups, filed the suit shortly before it was set to take effect on January 1, 2020 seeking to have the law struck down on the grounds that it is preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA). The district court entered a temporary restraining order on December 30, 2019, and later a preliminary injunction on February 7, 2020, blocking the law from taking effect. The state then appealed.

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Reminder: Promptly Investigate Harassment Complaints

Posted in Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention, Employment Discrimination Harassment & Retaliation

Even though the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the workplace has dominated the headlines recently, employers should be careful not to delay investigating non-pandemic-related complaints—particularly those of harassment. Failing to promptly investigate and correct harassing behavior can be costly. Based on a recent federal appellate court ruling, a month between complaint and action may not be prompt enough.

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Broad Vaccine Mandates Ahead

Posted in Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention, Workplace Safety & OSHA

Private employers with 100 or more employees will be required to ensure their employees are either “fully vaccinated” or provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test at least once a week, under President Biden’s new six-prong COVID-19 Action Plan (the “Plan”) announced September 9, 2021. The Plan also includes vaccination requirements for employees of healthcare facilities receiving Medicare or Medicaid reimbursements, federal employees and contractors, and certain schools and programs.

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Deadline Triggered as COBRA Premium Subsidy Ends

Posted in Employee Benefits

Employers and plans are reminded that they must provide a COBRA subsidy expiration notice no later than September 15, 2021, pursuant to the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA). ARPA had included some new COBRA obligations for both employers and participants. In particular, as noted in our previous posts, ARPA established a 100 percent COBRA premium subsidy that applied for a coverage period running from April 1, 2021, through September 30, 2021. That subsidy period is now coming to a close.

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No Vaccination, No Service For Indoor Dining, Entertainment, and Fitness in NYC

Posted in Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention, Workplace Safety & OSHA

Enforcement begins soon of New York City’s new executive order requiring certain indoor establishments to verify that staff and patrons have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine before entering the establishment. The executive order took effect on August 17 and inspectors will begin enforcing its requirements until September 13. This mandate is the first of its kind in the country.

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Should You Consider Offering Cheaper Health Plan Coverage in 2022 for Vaccinated Employees?

Posted in Employee Benefits, Employment Counseling & Workplace Claims Prevention

If you still have unvaccinated workers in January, might you provide a financial incentive for employees to be vaccinated, by charging them higher healthcare insurance premiums? That is the question facing exhausted but dedicated corporate Human Resources leaders as they approach annual open enrollment season, in which employees are asked to lock in their 2022 benefit plan year’s elections. As the price for 2022 health plan and other coverages come into sharper focus around this time of year, final decisions on what portion of plan costs should be borne by the company and what portion should be passed along to employees loom on the horizon.

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Colorado Employers May Need to Pay Out Accrued Vacation on Termination

Posted in Employee Handbooks & Policies, Wage & Hour

Colorado employers should carefully review their vacation and paid time off policies following a recent decision from the Colorado Supreme Court. On June 14, 2021, the Colorado Supreme Court held in Nieto v. Clark’s Market that although the Colorado Wage Claim Act (CWCA) does not require employers to provide employees with vacation pay, if the employer does elect to provide vacation pay, all accrued but unused vacation pay must be paid to employees upon termination of employment. This ruling is a reversal from precedent set by the Colorado Court of Appeals.

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