Andrew C. Karter

Andrew C. Karter

Andrew Karter defends employers in labor and employment litigation, including discrimination, harassment, retaliation, and wage and hour disputes in federal and state courts, and before administrative agencies including the NLRB, EEOC, the New York State Division of Human Rights, and the New York City Commission on Human Rights. His experience includes drafting pleadings, briefs, and memoranda, including dispositive motions, and preparing pre-trial memoranda and responses to administrative charges of discrimination. He also has experience drafting employee handbooks, employer policies, and collective bargaining agreements.

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New York State Approves Broadly Expanded Protections for Employees and Applicants

Note: This blog post has been updated to include all relevant effective dates now that Governor Cuomo has signed the bill into law.

New York State has enacted comprehensive reforms to broaden the scope of its discrimination and harassment laws, including one of the most robust anti-harassment bills in the #MeToo era, amendments to the State’s Equal Pay Act to … Continue Reading

Court Ruling Revives Pay Data EEO-1 Reporting Requirements

Employers may need to begin collecting pay and hours data to report on EEO-1 forms, now that a federal district judge revived the controversial requirement put in place during the Obama administration. During that administration, the EEO-1 form was revised to require employers with 100 or more employees to report earnings and hours worked within 12 pay bands, in addition … Continue Reading

Political Speech Inside (and Outside) of the Workplace

The new year has brought a new Congress, an ongoing government shutdown, and rumblings of the first formal campaign announcements for 2020. With more voters participating in last year’s election than ever before, employers should be prepared to handle issues arising from employees’ political speech and conduct.

The 2018 midterms were the first in history with a turnout surpassing 100 … Continue Reading

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