Rachel L. Perez

Rachel L. Perez

With a focus on immigration planning and compliance, Rachel Perez handles labor and employment matters. She represents multinational corporations and foreign clients in relocating, investing, and conducting business operations in the United States. Rachel assists clients in all aspects of corporate mobility and expansion, including advising international companies with respect to U.S. market entry strategy and ongoing operations in the United States. Rachel has experience planning for the specialized immigration needs of high net-worth foreign national entrepreneurs and investors, as well as assisting companies in developing and streamlining internal processes for the cross-border transfer of employees. Rachel regularly advises employers concerning audits of employees’ employment eligibility verification by the Department of Homeland Security and during investigations by the Department of Labor. Additionally, Rachel is devoted to the representation of domestic and foreign companies and their employees in all aspects of immigration and nationality law. She has extensive experience preparing a full range of U.S. immigrant and non-immigrant employment-based petitions for H-1 professional workers, H-2B seasonal workers, L-1 intracompany transferees, special category NAFTA professionals, extraordinary ability individuals, E treaty traders and investors, and preparing labor certified permanent residency petitions.

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SOS: Students Stuck Outside

A new and unexpected policy change will cause problems for students who plan to process visa applications from abroad. Foreign nationals who overstay their student visas could be barred from re-entering the U.S. under a draft policy memorandum issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on May 11. The new policy, which will supersede existing policy that’s … Continue Reading

Big Brother to Review Visa Applicants’ Social Media History?

Handing over access to your social media account might be the next big move in U.S. immigration law. In a formal notice issued on March 30, 2018, the Department of State advised that it plans to require nearly all visa applicants to the U.S. to submit five years of social media handles for specific platforms identified by the government, with … Continue Reading

Employers Relying On H-4 Dependent Spouse Visas Better Move Fast as April 1 Lottery Looms

Proposed changes to the rule authorizing employment for H-4 status holders could spell an increase in H-1B petitions this upcoming fiscal year, and ultimately, increased sponsorship costs for employers. Consequently, employers with workers who presented an H-4 EAD card as their I-9 employment eligibility documentation are strongly advised to consider sponsoring such workers who qualify for H-1B status in the … Continue Reading

Big Brother is Watching You: Feds Now Vetting Foreign Workers Via Social Media

Employers may need to start “following” the information their foreign national workers share on Twitter or Facebook, as the Department of Homeland Security is turning social media into the federal government’s latest surveillance tool. In October, the Modified Privacy Act System of Records was quietly implemented placing Facebook likes, interests, friends, Instagram photographs, Twitter tweets, work information shared on LinkedIn … Continue Reading

Higher Costs for Highly Skilled Foreign Workers in Store for Employers?

Despite the absence of new regulations or policies enacted following the President’s “Buy American and Hire American” Executive Order, a recent shift in the adjudication of H-1B visas indicates the Administration’s policy initiatives are already being accomplished behind the scenes. Employers should be aware that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is exercising greater scrutiny over H-1B petitions, issuing requests … Continue Reading

Up Against the Wall: New Immigration Measures Impact Employers

Employers will likely experience new challenges as the Trump Administration continues to expand its immigration enforcement efforts. Immigrants–including lawful permanent residents—can be subject to deportation for relatively low-level, minor offenses such as jaywalking and driving without a license. Employers can be subject to criminal penalties if a foreign national employee inadvertently falls out of legal status. Employees with family members … Continue Reading

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