Laurie M. Weinstein

Laurie M. Weinstein

With a focus on labor and employment litigation, Laurie Weinstein represents employers and executives in claims of discrimination, retaliation, misappropriation of trade secrets, unpaid overtime wages, and misclassification of employees as independent contractors. In addition, Laurie navigates commercial litigation disputes including breach of contract claims, fiduciary duty and fraud claims, and real estate disputes. She has represented businesses and individuals spanning a range of sectors, including hospitality, healthcare, and consumer goods and services.

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DOL: “Joint Employer” and “Independent Contractor” Guidance Out and Wage and Hour Opinion Letters In

On the heels of withdrawing published interpretations of the concepts of “joint employer” and “independent contractor,” the Secretary of Labor announced yesterday that it will reinstate the issuance of opinion letters. Opinion letters are official, written opinions by the Wage and Hour Division that explain how a law applies to specific sets of facts. In 2010, the Obama administration discontinued … Continue Reading

Whistleblower Split Widens

Employers take heed: there is a further split in authority as to whether whistleblowers are protected under the Dodd-Frank Act if they only report securities-law violations internally, and not to the Securities and Exchange Commission. A recent decision from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals adds to the existing split among federal appellate courts as to who is entitled … Continue Reading

Revised Version of the Form I-9 Became Mandatory on January 22, 2017

As of January 22, 2017, U.S. employers should be using the new Form I-9 for Employment Eligibility Verification, available here.

Federal immigration law requires that U.S. employers use the Form I-9 to verify the identity and employment authorization of new employees and to re-verify continuing employment authorization of existing workers who hold temporary employment authorization only. All U.S. employers … Continue Reading

Medical Marijuana and the Workplace

With the growing list of states legalizing marijuana, are workplace drug policies up in smoke? As the new year begins, Arkansas, Florida and North Dakota join the growing list of states that have legalized medical marijuana. Currently, 28 states* and Washington, D.C., have legalized marijuana use for certain medicinal purposes, and eight states** and the District of Columbia have legalized … Continue Reading

EEOC Announces Launch of Online Charge Status System

Employers can now electronically monitor and respond to EEOC charges of discrimination via a secure online portal. This means employers can receive updates and transmit information to the EEOC much more quickly than in the past. The EEOC’s Online Charge Status System is now available and can be accessed at http://www.eeoc.gov/employees/charge_status.cfm. This system also allows charging parties to electronically … Continue Reading

Sleeping on the Job Not Enough to Bar Transgender Bias Suit

A jury should decide whether a transgender employee caught sleeping on the job in a customer’s car was unlawfully terminated because of her transgender status, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled. Although the employer had initially persuaded the trial court to rule in its favor, a three-judge  panel from the Eleventh Circuit (covering Florida, Georgia and Alabama) reversed … Continue Reading

NLRB Finds No Joint Employment Relationship In First Decision Applying Browning-Ferris

In its first application of the landmark Browning-Ferris decision, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has determined that ACECO, a contractor, was not a joint employer with Green Jobworks, its staffing agency. In Browning-Ferris, the NLRB held that two or more entities would be considered joint employers if each one possessed sufficient control over employees’ essential terms and conditions … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Rules Against Employer on Religious Accommodation Standard for Job Applicant

The U.S. Supreme Court has held that to prevail in a Title VII disparate-treatment (i.e., intentional discrimination) claim, a job applicant need only show that his need for a religious accommodation was a motivating factor in the employer’s decision. An applicant does not need to show that the employer had knowledge of his need for the religious accommodation. EEOC v. Continue Reading

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